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BEA Schools add two more to this year’s staff
February 10, 2019

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There are three new teachers at Blue Earth Area Schools who started teaching after the current school year began.

Band teacher Noah Anderson had been previously profiled in the Register. Two other recently hired new teachers are Danielle Goo and Jordyn Jarr.

Danielle Goo

There is an old proverb which states, "Good things come to those who wait."

For Danielle Goo, the waiting did not take too long.

Goo is a first grade teacher in the Blue Earth Area Elementary School. However, she started the school year in 2018 as a long term substitute for fourth graders.

Due to large class sizes, a decision was made by the school to add another section to first grade beginning in early November and Goo became the teacher.

Goo grew up in Clara City, which is about 20 miles southwest of Willmar.

She is the second youngest of four children. Her older brother still resides in the Clara City area while both of her sisters moved out west to Idaho.

She attended Central Minnesota Christian School in Prinsburg which is located 12 miles east of Clara City. While in high school, Goo was active in volleyball, basketball and track.

She continued her education at Dordt College in Sioux Center, Iowa, where she earned her degree in elementary education with an endorsement in reading specialization.

Goo remained active in track all four years she was in college. She was a sprinter, did the long jump and ran the low hurdles.

Last year was a busy year for Goo. She graduated from college, got married to Will Goo in June and then began teaching in Blue Earth in September.

Goo and her husband Will reside in Blue Earth. He is an engineer in the county public works department.

"We like living in Blue Earth, we like the feel of a small town," Goo says. "It is easy to get to know people and everyone has been very welcoming and friendly."

Goo notes she loves being around the younger children, especially kindergarten through third graders.

"They are at an age where they are very impressionable, they are learning things for the first time," Goo explains. "I enjoy watching them discover new things."

With her endorsement in reading specialization, Goo says reading is her main focus.

"The biggest challenge is the diversity of where each student is in their reading readiness," Goo states. "It is also what makes it so rewarding when you see the growth which the students achieve."

When she is not in the classroom teaching, Goo and her husband enjoy being outdoors. An avid hiker, Goo says she and her husband love exploring the area.

She also hopes to get involved with helping coach track at the high school.

"We are still getting our feet on the ground," Goo comments. "Getting involved with the track program would help get me out in the community.

Marriage, a new job and living in a new city have brought a lot of change to her life in the last year. Goo is thankful she is only about two hours away from her hometown.

"It is a bonus to live here in a nice town, and yet be close enough so I can go home and visit my parents and brother," Goo says.

Jordyn Jarr

The retirement of Randy Kuechenmeister in January after 32.5 years as a physical education and health instructor opened up another mid-year position at BEA.

The timing was right for Jordyn Jarr to fill the vacant spot in the BEA teaching roster.

Fresh off of graduating from Minnesota State Mankato in December of 2018, Jarr heard about the job opening from a college professor who told her she should look into it.

She did look into it and on?Jan. 14 she began her teaching career at BEA.

Jarr says she is thankful to have been able to shadow Kuechenmeister as he taught classes during his last week. She mentions he has been very helpful during the transition stage.

Jarr's desire to teach came from two different teachers. One was her physical education teacher in high school who had an active teaching style and partook in the activities with the students.

The other person who inspired Jarr was a teacher she met through a volleyball camp she was attending. One of the coaches at the camp was a physical education teacher who told Jarr about all the different things which can be incorporated into a physical education class, such as rock climbing.

"It is not always about throwing a ball," Jarr says.

Being a physical education and health teacher, it is no surprise Jarr tries to maintain an active, healthy lifestyle.

She was a three-sport athlete in high school participating in volleyball, basketball and track.

Jarr lives in Mankato with her two dogs, Pepper and Blaze, and loves to take them on walks or runs. She also enjoys hiking when she gets the opportunity.

She grew up in Bloomer, Wisconsin, a town with a population of about 3,500 which is located north of Eau Claire.

"It is a town similar to Blue Earth, both towns are located in a farming community," Jarr explains.

Her grandparents live on a farm and she spent a lot of time with her two younger sisters enjoying being outdoors.

Jarr is the oldest of the three girls. Hailey is the next oldest and attends college at the University of Wisconsin-Stephens Point. The youngest of the girls, Rylie, is a junior in high school.

Jarr tries to get home when she can but it is harder now because of her job. She likes to arrange her trips home so she can see Rylie play volleyball or basketball.

Jarr graduated from high school in 2014. Her college degree is in health and physical education. She also has a separate DAPE (Developmental Adapted Physical Education) license which allows her to teach students with disabilities.

Jarr says she is still getting to know the Blue Earth area but likes what she has seen so far.

"The people have been so welcoming and helpful," Jarr comments.

She says getting to know the students and teaching them has been very enjoyable.

"Every day is different, it keeps you on your toes," Jarr comments. "I learn from the students every day."

She also has some long term goals in mind.

"I want to do what I can to increase the health and fitness in the school through nutrition and exercise," Jarr says. "I would also like to get involved in coaching at some point."

For now, as she settles in to her new job, Jarr is thankful for all the help and encouragement she has received from people, including students, while she gets accustomed to her new job.

"The kids have been very respectful during the transition and I am thankful for their patience," Jarr concludes.

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